• Feature Article

    Abused indigenous children need safe homes not derailed debate

    Helen Davidson |  Revived arguments about the removal of Indigenous children from their families are just the latest instalment of a “narrow debate” bringing Australia closer to another Northern Territory-style intervention, writes Helen Davidson for The Guardian.
  • Feature Article

    Timor-Leste water and food programs

    Siktus Harson and Thomas Ora |  Access to clean water and sanitation is difficult for many Timorese, particularly for those living in rural areas. To help address this, Jesuit Social Service (JSS) have built ten water towers that benefit more than 2,000 people.
  • Feature Article

    The fight to make water a human right

    Cristy Clark |  In 2010, the United Nations General Assembly and Human Rights Council recognised the existence of a human right to water, guaranteeing access for everyone to 'sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water for personal and domestic uses', writes Dr Cristy Clark forEureka Street.
  • Feature Article

    Solar PV and wind on track to replace all fossil fuels

    Andrew Blakers and Matthew Stocks |  Solar photovoltaic and wind power are rapidly getting cheaper and more abundant – so much so that they are on track to entirely supplant fossil fuels worldwide within two decades, with the time frame depending mostly on politics. The protestation from some politicians that we need to build new coal stations sounds rather quaint, write Andrew Blakers and Matthew Stocks forThe Conversation.
  • Feature Article

    Bin liners to takeaway containers: ideas to solve your plastic conundrums

    Koren Helbig |  Those dedicated to going plastic-free wonder how to dispose of cat litter or buy cleaning products sans packaging. Share your problems – and solution.
  • Feature Article

    Graveyard of dreams: Julian Burnside on the plight of refugees

    Luke Buckmaster |  In a scene from the Australian documentary Border Politics, presenter Julian Burnside AO QC visits a strange and surreal garbage dump on the Greek island of Lesbos, located off the coast of Turkey. Strewn across beautiful grassy hills, with aqua blue water visible in the background, is the unsettling sight of thousands upon thousands of life jackets.

Scathing critique of neoliberal capitalism

Cecily McNeill | 01 April 2018

Two stories of indigenous life on either side of the Tasman show how institutional racism works to maintain oppression, something Pope Francis rails against in Laudato Si’. The 2015 encyclical does not use the word “racism” but it is implied, as Sr Karen Donahue suggests, in the Pope’s critique of the neo-liberal economic system which fails to take account of its impact on humanity and the environment. See for example, LS #56.

 

Graveyard of dreams: Julian Burnside on the plight of refugees

Luke Buckmaster | 10 May 2018

In a scene from the Australian documentary Border Politics, presenter Julian Burnside AO QC visits a strange and surreal garbage dump on the Greek island of Lesbos, located off the coast of Turkey. Strewn across beautiful grassy hills, with aqua blue water visible in the background, is the unsettling sight of thousands upon thousands of life jackets.

Bin liners to takeaway containers: ideas to solve your plastic conundrums

Koren Helbig | 10 May 2018

Those dedicated to going plastic-free wonder how to dispose of cat litter or buy cleaning products sans packaging. Share your problems – and solution.

Timor-Leste water and food programs

Siktus Harson and Thomas Ora | 10 May 2018

Access to clean water and sanitation is difficult for many Timorese, particularly for those living in rural areas. To help address this, Jesuit Social Service (JSS) have built ten water towers that benefit more than 2,000 people.

Abused indigenous children need safe homes not derailed debate

Helen Davidson | 10 May 2018

Revived arguments about the removal of Indigenous children from their families are just the latest instalment of a “narrow debate” bringing Australia closer to another Northern Territory-style intervention, writes Helen Davidson for The Guardian.

Easter Island is critically vulnerable to rising ocean levels

Nicholas Casey | 01 April 2018

Waves are beginning to reach statues and platforms built 1,000 years ago. The island risks losing its cultural heritage. New York Times correspondent Nicholas Casey, based in Colombia, and Josh Haner, a Times photographer, travelled 3,500 kilometres off the coast of Chile to see how the ocean is erasing the island’s monuments.

BP’s failures in the Great Australian Bight documented

Karl Mathiesen | 01 April 2018

A major oil spill in the region would have covered up to 750km of beaches and disrupted whale migration, are revealed in government documents BP tried to suppress

Why I didn’t sit with the other Maori girls at school

Liana MacDonald | 01 April 2018

Stories about racial injustice in state institutions are no great surprise if you’re Māori, because you have stories of your own — although maybe you don’t think these stories are of any value. In a society that doesn’t like talking about race and racism, this perception is unsurprising. In fact, these stories have great power because they speak of oppression and racial inequality, writes Liana MacDonald for e-Tangata

How The Gap Widened, And How To ‘Refresh’ The Policy Approach For Remote Indigenous Australia

Jon Altman | 01 April 2018

Every year a report card on the government’s performance in lifting Indigenous Australians out of poverty documents more and more failure, and a widening gap. Professor Jon Altman takes to New Matilda to explain why

  • Editorial: recalling Rerum Novarum on the condition of work in May, the workers' month

    Cecily McNeill | 10 May 2018

    May kicks off with International Workers’ Day on the feast of St Joseph the Worker, an important anniversary in Catholic Social Teaching which started with Pope Leo XIII’s encyclical Rerum Novarum in 1891 on the condition of the working classes. 

  • No one's exercise of free speech should make another feel less free

    Moana Jackson | 10 May 2018

    Some of the noblest moments in human history have been struggles for freedom, but in the far from noble history of colonisation, the notion of freedom, and certainly free speech, has always been a term subjected to troubling interpretations.

  • Icebreaker buyer used sweatshop labour

    Jonathan Underhill and Nikki Mandow | 10 May 2018

    Iconic New Zealand merino clothing brand Icebreaker was sold to a company with a less-than-squeaky-clean history around worker conditions.
    Icebreaker's new owner, Pennsylvania-based VF Corp, whose brands include The North Face, Timberland, SmartWool, Vans, Wrangler and Lee, has been caught up in several cases of bad worker treatment in Asian factories producing its clothes over the last three years, write Jonathan Underhill and Nikki Mandow for Newsroom.

  • The fight to make water a human right

    Cristy Clark | 10 May 2018

    In 2010, the United Nations General Assembly and Human Rights Council recognised the existence of a human right to water, guaranteeing access for everyone to 'sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water for personal and domestic uses', writes Dr Cristy Clark for Eureka Street.

  • Solar PV and wind on track to replace all fossil fuels

    Andrew Blakers and Matthew Stocks | 10 May 2018

    Solar photovoltaic and wind power are rapidly getting cheaper and more abundant – so much so that they are on track to entirely supplant fossil fuels worldwide within two decades, with the time frame depending mostly on politics. The protestation from some politicians that we need to build new coal stations sounds rather quaint, write Andrew Blakers and Matthew Stocks for The Conversation

  • The myth about stopping the boats

    John Menadue | 10 May 2018

    With the appointment of Angus Campbell as the new Chief of the General Staff we have witnessed again the repetition of the nonsense that the Coalition and Operation Sovereign Borders stopped the boats. As if the media farce over a Chinese military base in Vanuatu was not enough the media has climbed aboard again 

  • Macron visits Ouvea on eve of anniversary

    Radio New Zealand | 10 May 2018

    The French president Emmanuel Macron has visited the island of Ouvea on the 30th anniversary of the bloody end of the 1988 hostage crisis

  • Government policies and the torture of refugees

    Spencer Zifcak | 01 April 2018

    Nils Melzer is the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment. Recently, he presented a damning report to the UN Human Rights Council on the subjection of refugees across the world to torture. Melzer’s fundamental contention was this. The primary cause for the massive abuse suffered by refugees globally is neither migration itself nor organized crime. 

  • New dose of cruelty: up to 7000 asylum seekers to lose income support

    Ben Doherty | 01 April 2018

    The federal government has outlined its plan to cut income support from up to 7,000 asylum seekers living in Australia from June, in a move lawyers and refugee support groups say could leave people destitute, hungry and at increased risk of self-harm, writes Ben Doherty for The Guardian.

  • The toxic mould and rot in Middlemore hospital

    David Galler  | 01 April 2018

    I was embarrassed and outraged by the news about the state of the hospital where I work [Middlemore Hospital in South Auckland], writes Dr David Galler – for this systematic betrayal of the very people we are here to serve and of the staff that work so hard to help them. And it goes to the fundamental question about what we choose to value


Editorial: recalling Rerum Novarum on the condition of work in May, the workers' month

Cecily McNeill | 10 May 2018

May kicks off with International Workers’ Day on the feast of St Joseph the Worker, an important anniversary in Catholic Social Teaching which started with Pope Leo XIII’s encyclical Rerum Novarum in 1891 on the condition of the working classes. 

  • Solar PV and wind on track to replace all fossil fuels

    Andrew Blakers and Matthew Stocks | 10 May 2018

    Solar photovoltaic and wind power are rapidly getting cheaper and more abundant – so much so that they are on track to entirely supplant fossil fuels worldwide within two decades, with the time frame depending mostly on politics. The protestation from some politicians that we need to build new coal stations sounds rather quaint, write Andrew Blakers and Matthew Stocks for The Conversation

  • Icebreaker buyer used sweatshop labour

    Jonathan Underhill and Nikki Mandow | 10 May 2018

    Iconic New Zealand merino clothing brand Icebreaker was sold to a company with a less-than-squeaky-clean history around worker conditions.
    Icebreaker's new owner, Pennsylvania-based VF Corp, whose brands include The North Face, Timberland, SmartWool, Vans, Wrangler and Lee, has been caught up in several cases of bad worker treatment in Asian factories producing its clothes over the last three years, write Jonathan Underhill and Nikki Mandow for Newsroom.

  • Cambodia’s modern repression has Khmer roots

    Alphonsus Pettit | 31 March 2018

    The Cambodian government has succeeded in shutting down the political opposition, critical thinking in the media and has sharpened its focus on non-government organizations, which have tried its patience over human rights issues. For some "The Repression" is shocking, for others the crackdown is simply a return to the country's communist past.

  • Caring for our neighbours

    Cecily McNeill | 31 March 2018

    Timor-Leste The hard-fought agreement between Australia and Timor-Leste over proceeds from the Greater Sunrise oil and gas field is a tribute to the tenacity of our tiny neighbour. Talks over how to share the $50 billion field have been going on since 2004.



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