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Slavery-free Easter chocolate

ACRATH |  30 March 2018

Children as young as 12 years old are picking cocoa in West Africa to make the chocolate we eat. Some of these children are trafficked. Most are forced to pick cocoa from an early age for minimal or no wages, for long hours, in dangerous working conditions, without any possibility of attending school. Most of these children have never tasted chocolate and they never will.

Chocolate eaters around the world have made a difference already. A decade ago, slavery-free chocolate was hard to find in our shops. Some successes are:

 


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